About Acupuncture for Women

Acupuncturist Jane Liu

Jane Liu, Lic.Ac., MD (China), is a Dallas TX Acupuncturist for infertility treatment who received her medical degree from Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in Guangzhou, China in 1985. Dr. Liu then spent 3 years working in the gynecology department of the Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Guangdong. After receiving her master’s degree in Gynecology in 1991, she continued to teach Gynecology and was the physician in charge at the teaching hospital of Guangzhou University of Traditional Medicine. Being one of few people in the U.S. who went through eight years formal training in Gynecology in both Western and Eastern medical fields, Dr. Liu has devoted a significant amount of time to research on a natural approach to women’s health and healing. Recipient of the “Achievement Award in Chinese Medicine” after being selected by her peers at the Health Administration in Guangdong Province, China, she also received recognition by the National Committee of Science & Technology in China, and has numerous articles in various professional journals. In 1996, she became a resident in the United States, and, after teaching a class on diagnosis and treatment at the Dallas College of Oriental Medicine and writing in various newspapers, this Dallas, TX, Acupuncturist for fertility issues opened her own alternative medicine clinic, specializing in women’s health. Over the last ten years, Dr. Liu has helped more a thousand women conceive.

Patients seeking fertility & IVF/IUI enhancement, miscarriage prevention, relief from endometriosis, recurrent pregnancy loss, PCOS, aging eggs, thin endometrial lining, elevated FSH level, luteal phase defects, menstrual disorder, ovulatory defects, low ovarian reserve and menopause syndrome make up most of her current workload.

Acupuncture Specialist C. John Qin

C. John Qin, L.Ac., M.D.(China), is a certified Dallas,TX, Acupuncturist for fertility issues who received his certification from the National Certification of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. He graduated in 1985 from Guangzhou University of Chinese medicine in Guangzhou, China and is well known as a clinician, columnist and educator in the field of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Dr. Qin’s professional experience includes a medical doctor degree and Master degree of science in traditional Chinese medicine.

Having spent near 20 years in research on a natural approach to health and healing, and applied his research in his practice to bring relief to many people, he now specializes in stress & pain management, male infertility and health issues. He has committed the past 20 years to research and writing, seeking to make the best of  the knowledge and scientific research available, to help people who desire optimal health for increased longevity. He believes even with all the advanced technology available today, there cannot be a single “magic bullet” for real health improvement. We can only use the tools and methods science has provided as a guide to aid in healing and prevention. He encourages his patient to remember that nature created herbs and whole foods for a reason, and that eating a proper diet and, when appropriate, taking herbs, is the best defense against illness.

Clinic Approach

You may have heard that acupuncture is beneficial for pain relief or to quit smoking. But is it really effective in treating infertility, hormone imbalance, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, morning sickness, and weakened immune systems – symptoms that many times we’re told to learn to live with or surgically remove! If you’ve been searching for a Dallas, TX, acupuncturist for fertility issues, you’re in the right place.

“Yes, it’s effective,” says Liu, who has successfully helped over 700 women conceive in her career.

A graceful symmetry between the opposing forces of yin and yang provides the foundation for many medical treatments developed in China. Maintaining the symmetry – balance – is the key to health.

“There must be a balance between the mind and body,” explains Liu. “The body follows the orders of mind. We ask our body to do hundred of things at once, and the body tries. But if the body is overwhelmed it can’t comply. That’s when the problems come – hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, disturbed sleep, weight gain, dysmenorrhea, infertility, endometriosis, depression, stress, hypertension. We live in a high-stress society and that doesn’t help.”

Medical practitioners in China have been honing techniques to achieve that balance by harnessing and manipulating internal and external energy forces for centuries. Acupuncture, Liu’s specialty, is one such technique. The premise is that imbalances in energy flow cause disease, and acupuncture is a way to create and maintain the proper balance.

When you seek acupuncture and herbal treatment for your condition or disorder, you may receive one of numerous diagnoses. Depending upon your history or physical symptoms, as well as your physical examination, specific acupuncture points and herbs will be selected that are appropriate for your condition.

During treatment, small needles are inserted in various patterns into the series of energy pathways throughout the body. Adjusting the needles causes energy flow to increase, decrease, or be redirected, as needed.

Chinese herbs are used to regulate the female endocrine system. For example, Liu treats PMS with a range of herbs. Patients consistently report a marked decrease in hot flashes, pain with intercourse, digestive symptoms, along with an improvement in mental outlook and decrease of lassitude.

As we know, the immune system is the body’s natural stronghold against viruses, bacteria, and yeast. A strong immune system is our best defense against illness and disease. For decades, conventional medicine has insisted there was no way to prevent the inevitable decline of a person’s immune system due to time and environmental factors. More and more Americans are now discovering that Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture therapy is a great preventative tool – because it is truly effective in boosting your immune system and preventing disease

FAQ: ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY

What is acupuncture?
What should I expect from a treatment?
How many treatments will I need?
Is acupuncture painful?
What is electronic stimulation?
Are there conditions that should not be treated with acupuncture?
Are there any risks I should be aware of?
How can I find a qualified practitioner in my local area?
How much does a treatment cost?
Will my medical insurance cover acupuncture treatments?

CHINESE HERBAL THERAPY

There are various modes of herbal medication. In our clinic, we carefully select the standardized full-spectrum extracts, which we think are the most appropriate and beneficial herbs for our patients.
What are herbal extracts?
Are there any side-effects?
Can I take herbal supplements with my prescription drugs?
Are there herbal alternatives to prescription medication?
Can children and elderly patients and take herbal supplements?
Can pregnant or nursing women take herbal supplements?
How should I store herbal medication?
Why do you select standardized full-spectrum extracts in your practice?

ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY

What is acupuncture?
Acupuncture is a treatment based on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a system of healing that dates back thousands of years. At the core of TCM is the notion that a type of life force or energy known as qi (pronounced “chi”) flows through channels in the body called meridians. Each meridian is connected to one specific organ, or group of organs, that governs particular bodily functions. When there’s too little or too much qi in a meridian or when the qi stagnates or is blocked, illness results. Acupuncture treatment consists of inserting thin stainless steel needles at various points on the body, known as gateways, to unblock or rebalance the flow of qi.
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What should I expect from a treatment?
Treatments generally take about 45 minutes or so, allowing adequate time for a consultation with your acupuncturist. Your first treatment may last a little longer so that the acupuncturist has time to learn about you.
In addition to asking questions, the acupuncturist may want to take your pulse at several points along the wrist and look at your tongue to observe its shape, color, and coating. He or she may also observe the color and texture of your skin, your posture, and other physical characteristics that offer clues to your health. You will then be asked to lie down on a padded examining table, and the acupuncturist will insert the needles, twirling or gently jiggling each as it goes in.

You may not feel the needles at all, or you may feel a twitch or a momentary twinge that subsides as soon as the needle is completely in. Once the needles are all in place, you’ll rest for around 30 minutes. During this time, you’ll probably feel relaxed and sleepy and may even doze off. At the end of the session, the acupuncturist will quickly and painlessly remove the needles.
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How many treatments will I need?
The number of acupuncture treatments needed depends on the complexity of your illness, whether it’s a chronic or recent condition, and your general state of health. For example, you may need only one treatment for a recent wrist sprain, whereas for a longstanding, chronic illness you may need treatments once or twice a week for several months to get good results.
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Is acupuncture painful?
One would assume that inserting a needle into the skin would be painful. But while you will feel the needle being inserted, most patients do not describe it as painful, rather they describe a sensation of mild to moderate heaviness or tingling.

In general, Most patients find the treatment very relaxing, which brings on a feeling of well-being. Most are surprised at how comfortable they are during treatment and how easily the needles are placed. Some people even go to sleep during treatment.
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What is electronic stimulation?
Needles obviously still have their place in clinical practice. However many physicians certified in Acupuncture and licensed Acupuncturists are employing electronic and laser stimulation to the acupuncture point with equal effectiveness as the needle. Both of these procedures are painless and are quickly becoming standard worldwide. The tapping needle is not really a needle as it does not pierce the skin. It produces a mild to moderate sensation. Compare it to tapping a ball point pen on the skin. This form of stimulation has been used successfully for centuries. Thumb pressure is equally impressive and not considered painful.
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Are there conditions that should not be treated with acupuncture?
Some physicians and practitioners may avoid treating patients during pregnancy.
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Are there any risks I should be aware of?
If your acupuncturist is qualified to dispense herbs and would like you to take them as part of your treatment, first discuss it with your physician. Herbs are potent substances that can be harmful if you suffer from certain conditions; they can also interact with drugs you may be taking and cause side effects. In addition, be sure your acupuncturist uses only disposable needles.
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How can I find a qualified practitioner in my local area?
There are several ways to find a qualified practitioner. A few states require acupuncturists to be licensed and confer a title (such as L.Ac.) that these acupuncturists can use to identify themselves. The National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine certifies acupuncturists (Dipl. Ac.) and practitioners of Chinese herbal medicine (Dipl. C.H.), upon passing a qualifying exam.
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How much does a treatment cost?
Each visit costs $75 in our clinic. Herbal therapy, if needed, is an addition $25 per bottle. We also charge an one time consultation fee ($30) on your first visit.
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Will my medical insurance cover acupuncture treatments?
An increasing number of insurance providers, such as BlueCross BlueShield, Unitedhealth, Oxford and Kaiser Permanente, now cover all or part of the cost of acupuncture treatments, but they may have restrictions on the types of illnesses covered. Check with your insurance company to see what your policy offers. If your insurance company covers acupuncture, you must file your own claim; we do not file it for you.
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CHINESE HERBAL THERAPY

What are herbal extracts?
Herbal extracts are the “essence” of bulk herbs. Through a long and sophisticated process, the active components in bulk herbs are removed and condensed into herbal extracts. As finished products, herbal extracts are at a 5:1 concentration ratio, which means 5 pounds of raw herbs yields 1 pound of concentrate.
The manufacturing process of our herbal extracts follows the standard Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), which ensures safety and potency of the herbs. It starts with the selection of the finest raw herbs, followed by the most stringent manufacturing procedures, and finishes with numerous quality assurance tests.
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Are there any side-effects?
All herbal extracts from our clinic are 100% natural. They do not contain any harsh chemicals or preservatives and are very gentle to your system. Nonetheless, sensitive patients may experience reactions such as minor stomach discomfort. If such reactions occur, reduce the dosage, take with food, or modify the herbal formula.
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Can I take herbal supplements with my prescription drugs?
Most herbal supplements may be taken by individuals who are also using prescription drugs, without problems. However, it is recommended that herbal extracts be taken on an empty stomach at least two hours apart from the prescription drugs.
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Are there herbal alternatives to prescription medication?
There are many conditions, which can be treated by either drugs or herbs with comparable effectiveness. Patients who do not wish to take prescription drugs, or cannot tolerate drugs due to side effects or adverse reactions, do have alternatives with herbal remedies. Just ask us.
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Can children and elderly patients and take herbal supplements?
Yes, children and elderly patients may take herbal extracts. In fact, they get excellent clinical results. The dosages, however, must be adjusted for each patient depending on age, body weight, specific illness and overall condition.
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Can pregnant or nursing women take herbal supplements?
In general, we are more careful about the use of herbs during pregnancy. However, should the benefits of using herbs outweigh the risks, use of herbs may be initiated at a low levels with professional supervision.
In addition, we specialize in the use of herbs during nursing. Herbs are secreted in breast milk and passed on to infants. Therefore, infants can be affected if the nursing mother is taking herbs.
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How should I store herbal medication?
Herbal supplements should be stored in cool, dry places away from sunlight and moisture. The UV radiation in sunlight may change the properties of the products. Storage of herbal extracts in a damp or humid environment, such as the kitchen or the bathroom, may lead to “caking” of the powder due to excess moisture.
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Why do you select standardized full-spectrum extracts in your practice?
All herbal products have their advantages and disadvantages. There are various modes of herbal preparations and types of delivery systems. In our clinic, we carefully select the standardized full-spectrum extracts, which we think is most effective and appropriate type of herbs for our patients. Let us compare the pros and cons of each preparation and its delivery system:

HERBAL DECOCTIONS: Although effective, there are several potential disadvantages to prescribing herbal decoctions. Patients find them time-consuming to prepare and sometimes unpleasant in taste and/or smell. Thus, patient compliance with decoction may often be poor. If there are herbs in the formula that require special handling, patients may find the complicated cooking process difficult to follow. Less than optimal cooking processes lead to incomplete extraction of active ingredients and compromise the overall effectiveness of the formula.

RAW HERB CAPSULES: Raw herb capsules may often contain high levels of fiber, bacteria, fungus, mold and sulfur from fumigation. Furthermore, bulk fiber requires digestion and may not be suitable for patients with weak constitutions or compromised digestive systems. Raw herb capsules are prevalent in the market but are not the best choice for practitioners who prescribe herbs for therapeutic purposes.

RAW HERB TABLETS: Raw herb powders are compressed into tablets using chemical binding agents that may be harmful to your body. All the disadvantages of raw herb capsules are also present in the raw herb tablets. Some manufacturers include an excess amount of fillers that dilute the potency of the final products. Others claim to sell concentrated herbal tablets that in fact contain mostly raw herb powder, evident from the visible fibers. Due to the slow onset of action and low concentration of active constituents, raw herb tablets are not ideal for therapeutic purposes.

FREEZE DRIED HERBS: With freeze dried herbs, the moisture is removed while the herbs are still frozen to prevent hydrolysis. Herbal products made from this process are highly unstable due to their hydroscopic nature (tendency to absorb moisture in the air). Their shelf life is short because they rapidly degrade biochemically.

STANDARDIZED EXTRACT: Herbal extraction processes for standardized extracts often use toxic solvents (i.e., acetones and hexanes) and high heat to yield a high content of one active ingredient. Though this process provides standardization based on one ingredient, it ignores the rest of the active constituents and their therapeutic actions. This delivery system is most commonly-seen in health food stores. Products of this nature are comparable to pharmaceuticals and not suitable for practitioners of herbal medicine who utilize the full-spectrum of therapeutic properties in each herb.

STANDARDIZED FULL-SPECTRUM EXTRACTS: Standardized full-spectrum extracts are highly concentrated using a low-temperature vacuum evaporation process, which preserves the integrity of all the active compounds present. Quality control includes both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the active ingredients utilizing the latest laboratory techniques such as High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), and Liquid Column Chromatography (LCC). Through extraction, the full spectrum of active constituents is retained and the overall affect mimics that of decoctions because the extracts contain the full range of constituents naturally found in fresh herbs. It is the most effective delivery system available in the market today. This is the best choice for our patient.
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